Node.js: How to make POST Requests with JSON data

In this post I’m going to show you how to work with POST requests, I’ll give you an example as simple as possible. First I’ll create the Nodejs app to receive the requests, then I’ll show you how to make the requests from the frontend.

We’re going to be using Expressjs, it’s a very popular npm package, you probably already heard of it, but if you don’t, just click here to see the instructions on how to create your project. You can also add express to an existing project via npm, but in this case you’ll have to add the body-parser as well.

Express creates a basic project structure for us, but most of it will not be used in this example, so I’m going to open my app.js and get rid of almost everything, this is the minimum we need to create requests routes:

var express = require('express');
var bodyParser = require('body-parser');
var app = express();
 
app.use(bodyParser.json());
app.use(bodyParser.urlencoded({ extended: false }));
 
<pre lang="javascript">
app.use((req, res, next) => {
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Origin', '*');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Methods', 'GET, POST, OPTIONS, PUT, PATCH, DELETE');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Headers', 'X-Requested-With,content-type');
    res.setHeader('Access-Control-Allow-Credentials', true);
    next();
});
 
module.exports = app;

Now let’s create our first route, I’m putting it at the end, right above the module.exports line:

app.post('/test', (request, response) => {
   console.log(request.body);
   response.json(request.body);
});

Here I’m using the express post function to create the route, it receives the path, which in this case is /test and a callback function to handle the request. Note that this function has two parameters, request and response. The first contains the JSON data passed by the client, it can be accessed through the attribute body. The second is where we put the result, so the client can receive it when the request completes.

In this example, after receiving a request the server will print the JSON dataset sent by the client and then send back the exact same data.

Ok, we’re done with the server-side now, let’s see how to make requests with the Fetch API on the frontend.

var data = [{"username": "dmccreadie0"}, 
   {"username": "bwillerson1"}, 
   {"username": "fteese2"}, 
   {"username": "dsummerell3"}];
 
fetch('http://localhost:3000/test', {
    method: 'POST',
    body: JSON.stringify(data),
    headers: {'Content-Type': 'application/json'}
}).then(response => { 
  return response.json(); 
}).then(data => { 
  alert(JSON.stringify(data));
}).catch(err => {
    alert(err);
});

The variable data is a simple JSON dataset I’ve created to use as an example. When making a request with fetch() we have to pass the URL, which in this case is http://localhost:3000/test, and an object containing the request options (method, body and header). To include the JSON data in the request we have to convert it to string and assign it to the body attribute, this way the server will be able to retrieve this data as we saw before.

Lastly, let’s see how to get the data sent by the server. The function then() allows us to add a callback that handles the response. To retrieve our data we just have to use the function json(). In this example I’m just extracting the JSON from the response and showing it to the user with an alert dialog.

That’s pretty much it guys, of course there’s much more we can do here, it’s a big topic, but as I said this is just a basic example. If you have any doubts don’t hesitate to ask in the comments.

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